Forest Based Industries

Forest area of Chhattisgarh approx 59,772 square kilometers, which is 44.21 percent of the Chhattisgarh ‘s geographical area. Third rank in the country In terms of forest covers.
Forests of Chhattisgarh state divided into two major categories, namely Tropical Humid Deciduous forest and tropical dry Deciduous forest. The state’s two main tree species are sal (Shorea robusta) and teak (Tectona grandis). In addition, the Top Canopy species are bija (Pterocarpus marsupium), Saja (Terminalia tomentosa), Dhavdha (Anogeissus latifolia), Mahua (Madhuca indica), Tendu (Diospyros melanoxylon). Mid-Canopy species are Anwala (Embilica officinalis), Karra (Cleistanthus collius) and bamboo (Dendrocalamus strictus) etc. There are various vegetation found in state and which are so important in terms of environmental balance, as well as they are the principal means of livelihood of forest-dwellers.

In consonance with the National Forest Policy 1988, forest based industries should be encouraged to produce their own raw material through private forestry and to use alternative raw material.
No forest based enterprise, except that at the village or cottage level, should be allowed in future without a proper ecological, cultural and social impact assessment. The fuel, fodder and timber requirements of the local population should not be sacrificed for raw material supplies to such enterprises.
Direct relationship between forest based industry and farmers should be encouraged to meet the raw material requirements of the industry. This industryfarmer collaboration should in no way be allowed to result in diversion of prime agricultural lands and displacement of small and marginal farmers.
The bio- mass resources of the state should not be subsidized to the industry, which should be encouraged, to the extent possible, to use alternative non-forest raw material.
Allotment of land to the industry should be subject to land ceiling and other land laws of the state. Such industry should not in any way be allowed to adversely affect the socio-cultural traditions of the tribals and other communities living in the state.
Appropriate institutional and technological systems should be developed to enable rural artisans to sustain their biomass-based crafts and enterprise.

Forest-based Industry includes- the paper industry, match industry, silk industry, lac industry, sports goods industry and handicraft.

Paper Industry

The first effort to produce paper by modern techniques was done in 1816 in Tanjavur (Tamil Nadu). It was unsuccessful. The first successful paper mill was set up in 1879 in Lucknow. Again, in 1881, paper mills were set up in Titagarh (West Bengal). It is considered the beginning of modern paper industry. Paper industry is a weight-losing industry. About two and half tons raw materials are needed for making one ton paper. So, the localization of this industry is mainly in the areas of raw materials. The following raw materials are used in making paper in India

• Soft wood-In India, soft wood (of coniferous trees) is obtained from the Himalayan region. Seven per cent of the total raw materials used in the paper industry in India is obtained from soft wood.

• Bamboo-Bamboo is the mostly used raw material for making paper in India. 70% raw material for paper industry is obtained from bamboo. Karnataka is the largest producer of bamboo followed by Assam.

• Sabai grass-Sabai grass provides 15% raw material. The best quality paper is produced from its fibres. Madhya Pradesh is the largest producer of sabai grass. Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Odisha are other major sabai grass producing states.

• Bagasse-It is a sugarcane residual part. 7% pulp for paper industry is obtained, from bagasse. Industrial paper, hard board paper, packing paper etc are made from it.

• Rags-Pulp is also made from wastepaper and rags. It is used to make handmade paper. India is foremost in production of handmade paper. India also exports it. This paper is used in making university certificates. Asia’s largest handmade paper mill is in Puducherry.

Besides rags, straw of paddy, wheat and maize is also used in making paper

Match Industry

The first match factory in India was set up in 1921 in Ahmedabad. Match factories were set up in 1924 and 1925 in Bareilly, Kolkata, Chennai, Ambarnath and Dhubri. The matchstick is made by a special kind of soft wood. The wood of the trees called dhoop, markat, salai, semal, sundari etc is especially useful for it. The chemicals which are needed for match are imported. This industry has developed mostly in West Bengal and Tamil Nadu. In West Bengal, it is concentrated mainly in 24 Paragana and Kolkata.

In Tamil Nadu most of the factories are in Ramanathapuram district. Factories are also in Chhattisgarh (Bilaspur).

Silk Industry

There are two stages in silk industry:

• Sericulture and obtaining of silk fibres

• Production of silk textile from silk fibres (silk textile industry)

Sericulture: It is completely forest based industry. Sericulture is done mainly on the mulberry trees. Besides it, sericulture is also done on the trees ‘like oak, mahua, castor, sal, plum, kusum etc. More than half of the total silk production in the country is done in Karnataka alone. Other major silk producing states are West Bengal, Jammu & Kashmir, Odisha, Madhya Pradesh, Jharkhand etc. Several kinds of silk are produced in India:

• Mulberry silk-Silk made by sericulture on mulberry trees. It is the best kind of silk. 85% of the silk produced in the country is mulberry silk. It is produced in Karnataka (Bengaluru, Mysore, Kolar and Tumkur districts), West Bengal (Bankura, Murshidabad, Midnapur and Burdwan districts), Jammu & Kashmir and Assam.

• Muga silk-It is also produced by sericulture done on the mulberry leaves. Its production is mostly done in Assam, West Bengal and Jammu & Kashmir.

• Tasar silk-It is produced by sericulture done on the wild mulberry trees. The major tasar silk producing states are Jharkhand, Odisha and Madhya Pradesh.

• Eri silk-It is produced by sericulture done on the leaves of castor. It is a low quality silk.

The beedi making industry has developed mainly in tribal regions. Madhya Pradesh is the largest producer of beedi because the tendu leaves are found mostly in the forests of this state. Several chemical industries related to sandalwood in Karnataka and eucalyptus in Tamil Nadu has developed. The woodcraft industry has developed in Karnataka, Himachal Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir. Copra (coconut and its fibres) industry (undertaken by the Coconut Board of India) has developed in Kerala.

CGPCS Notes brings Prelims and Mains programs for CGPCS Prelims and CGPCS Mains Exam preparation. Various Programs initiated by CGPCS Notes are as follows:- [carousel-horizontal-posts-content-slider]