Central Provinces

Prominent saints of chattishgarh

Prominent saints of chattishgarh Vallabha Vallabhacharya (1479–1531 CE), also known as Vallabha, was a devotional philosopher, who founded the Krishna-centered Pushti sect of Vaishnavism in the Braj region of India, and the philosophy of Shuddha advaita. Vallabha was born in a Telugu Brahmin family that had been living in Varanasi, who escaped to the Champaran of Chhattisgarh state while expecting Vallabha, during the turbulent times of Hindu-Muslim conflicts in the late 15th century.Vallabha studied the Vedas and the Upanishads as a child, then travelled throughout the Indian subcontinent over 20 years. He became one of the important leaders of the ... Read more

Independence and Partition of India

Mountbatten plan The British government sent a Cabinet Mission to India in March 1946 to negotiate with Indian leaders and agree to the terms of the transfer of power. After difficult negotiations a federal solution was proposed. Despite initial agreement, both sides eventually rejected the plan. An interim government with representatives of all the Indian parties was proposed and implemented. However, it soon collapsed through lack of agreement. While the Muslim League consented to join the interim government the Indian National Congress refused. By the end of 1946 communal violence was escalating and the British began to fear that India ... Read more

Divisions and Districts of Chhattisgarh

Divisions and Districts of Chhattisgarh After Indian Independence, the princely states were merged with the Central Provinces and Berar to form the new state of Madhya Pradesh. Present-day Chhattisgarh comprised seven districts of Madhya Pradesh. The former states of Kanker and Bastar formed the new Bastar District, the parts of Surguja, Korea, and Chang Bhakar formed the new Surguja District, and the states of Nandgaon, Khairagarh, and Kawardha formed the new Rajnandgaon District. In 1998, the seven districts that make up present-day Chhattisgarh were reorganized to form 16 districts. Dantewada and Kanker districts were split from Bastar; Dhamtari District was ... Read more

Feudatory States in Chhattisgarh

Feudatory States in Chhattisgarh:—- The history of the Chhattisgarh region dates back to about the 4th century ce, when it was known as Southern (or South) Kosala. The name Chhattisgarh, meaning “thirty-six forts,” was formerly applied to the territory of the Haihaya dynasty of Ratanpur, founded about 750. Under British rule the present region of Chhattisgarh consisted of a division comprising 14 feudatory princely kingdoms under the Eastern States Agency. Raipur was the headquarters of that division. The Chhattisgarh feudatory states with the Central Provinces in 1905 are:- Bastar, Kanker, Nandgaon, Khairagarh, Chhuikhadan, Kawardha, Raigarh, Sakti, Sarangarh, Surguja, Udaipur, Jashpur, ... Read more

Former Pricely States of Chhattisgarh and Zamindaris

Former Pricely States of Chhattisgarh and Zamindaris Merger of Chhattisgarh States There were 15 Chattisgarh states, the biggest of them being Bastar with an area of 15029 Sq miles (39060 sq. km.) and a population over half a million. The smallest, Sakti had an area of 138 sq. miles and its population was around a lakh. Most of these states were the making of aborignial chiefs who in course of time in accordance with India’s social tradition, claimed the status of the so-called Kshatriyas. They were orignally Zamindaris and Jagirdaris but in 1861 when the Central provinces was fromed, they ... Read more

The Home Rule Movement

After being released in 1914, Tilak sought re-entry into Congress. Annie Besant and Gokhale supported. But finally Pherozshah Mehta won and Tilak was not admitted. Tilak and Besant decided to start the home rule movement on their own. In early 1915, Annie Besant (and S Subramaniya Iyer) launched a campaign through her two newspapers, New India and Commonweal, and organized public meetings and conferences to demand that India be granted self-government on the lines of the White colonies after the War. From April 1915, her tone became more peremptory and her stance more aggressive. At the annual session of the ... Read more